Our Stories

Our Stories

The man behind the Tuscan splendour tourists come to see
On the anniversary of his birth 500 years ago, due recognition of art patron Cosimo I de’Medici is long overdue - and the Art Gallery of NSW has drawn on Macquarie University expertise to mark the occassionthis month.
New tests uncover killer cannabinoids
Macquarie University researcher Shivani Sachdev has developed new tests to analyse synthetic cannabinoids and found some are up to 300 times more powerful than the cannabis plant.
Smartphones are making us stupid – and may be a 'gateway drug'
Neuroscience research shows that smartphones are making us stupider, less social, more forgetful, more prone to addiction, sleepless and depressed, and poor at navigation – so why are we giving them to kids?
How do shells form?
PhD student Matthew Kerr, from the Department of Biological Sciences, explains.
The designer mozzies that could eradicate killer diseases
Engineered, designed-in-a-lab mosquitoes could be the key to wiping out a host of tropical diseases.
When will Australia’s volcanoes erupt?
A Macquarie University volcanologist is calling on authorities to implement an emergency response plan, warning an eruption in the Newer Volcanics Province - an area with over 400 volcanoes - could threaten Melbourne, Sydney and the east of Australia
Invention: a breath test to detect asthma, diabetes and lung cancer
Macquarie scientist Dr Noushin Nasiri is fine-tuning years of research to develop a breathalyser that could potentially detect 22 different diseases.
‘Fitbits’ throw light on secret lives of sharks
Tagging technology is opening up new frontiers for scientists to observe the behaviour of animals.
Children who have music lessons are quick learners
Music lessons may one day be used for treating children and adults with certain kinds of learning impairments, researchers say.
What's the difference between business winners and losers?
Why do some companies succeed and some fail? What differentiates the one start-up that becomes a unicorn from the ones that go nowhere?
Why do we dream?
There are many different theories about why we dream, but of all of them, Sigmund Freud’s has proven to be the most provocative. Associate Professor Simon Boag explains.
Honey, they shrunk the groceries
No, it's not your imagination. In recent years, food manufacturers have shrunk the size of everything from jars of Vegemite to Freddo Frogs while keeping the price the same. It’s called shrinkflation.