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Latest research news

Life in a New Language: how migrants face the challenge

A new book by a team of linguists led by Distinguished Professor Ingrid Piller shows what it means to live one’s life through the medium of a new language, and where policy needs to shift to better shape those lives.

Ants navigate the night by moonlight: discovery

Macquarie University researchers have discovered Australian bull ants use the moon’s light to navigate at night, revealing new insights into nocturnal animal behaviour.

Hospital noise as loud as a lawn mower: sleep data sparks aircraft-inspired solution

A Macquarie University researcher has helped develop a program that reduces sleep disturbance during hospital stays, with research showing a few simple steps can help patients receive the restorative rest essential to healing.

Dracula at the Sydney Theatre Company: review

Dracula, the new and final instalment in Kip Williams’ Gothic trilogy for Sydney Theatre Company is the latest production in a long history of adapting this most famous of vampire tales. The show is fresh and enthralling, summoning the spectre of this Victorian novel for the 21st century technological era.

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Health and Medicine

Journalling about everyday stressors could boost resilience

Just 15 minutes a week spent writing about how we have successfully coped with difficult situations could help make us more resilient, Macquarie University psychology researchers have found.

The bone that could hold the key to preventing repeated ACL injuries

Young athletes who suffer repeated anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries often share a common factor. MQ Health orthopaedic surgeon Dr Michael Dan wants to keep more players on the field by making a procedure already helping our canine companions a more common fix for humans.

Walking to combat back pain: world-first study shows dramatic improvement

Adults with a history of low back pain lasted nearly twice as long without a recurrence if they walked regularly, a world-first study has found.

Older people still benefiting 10 years after treatment for depression and anxiety

A groundbreaking study has found people aged 65 and older can experience long-term benefits from treatment for depression and anxiety, even in the face of new stressors such as the death of a spouse.

Please Explain

Please explain: Should you wear sunscreen all year round?

Summer may be officially over, but here's why you should wear sunscreen every day of the year. Macquarie University general practitioner at MQ Health's Skin Cancer Clinic, Dr Vivianne Xia, explains.

Please explain: What is sustainable finance?

To smooth Australia’s pathway to net zero, the Federal Government recently released its Sustainable Finance Strategy. To what extent is it a force for good? Dr Rohan Best, senior lecturer in finance and economics, explains.

Science and Technology

Hot spot 'saunas' a new lifeline for endangered frog populations

New biologist-designed heated shelters will help endangered frogs survive the devastating impact of a deadly fungal disease by regulating their body temperature to fight off infection.

Ants navigate the night by moonlight: discovery

Macquarie University researchers have discovered Australian bull ants use the moon’s light to navigate at night, revealing new insights into nocturnal animal behaviour.

Mislabelled shark meat rampant in Australian markets, study finds

A new study by Macquarie University researchers has revealed widespread mislabelling of shark meat in Australian markets, including the sale of threatened species, highlighting the need for improved enforcement to protect consumers and shark populations.

Snakes: The new, high-protein superfood

Pythons are a low-emission, climate-resilient food source, converting feed to protein better than chickens or cattle, new research has found.

Arts and Society

Life in a New Language: how migrants face the challenge

A new book by a team of linguists led by Distinguished Professor Ingrid Piller shows what it means to live one’s life through the medium of a new language, and where policy needs to shift to better shape those lives.

How sexuality and gender has influenced citizenship in modern Australia: new book

Historian and co-author Associate Professor Leigh Boucher explains how campaigning on a platform of personal politics has influenced law reform and human rights in Australia over the past 50 years.

AI immortality: how deathbots are changing the way we grieve

A new paper by Dr Regina Fabry and Associate Professor Mark Alfano, from Macquarie University’s Department of Philosophy, explores the impact “deathbots” might have on the way grief is experienced and the ethical implications.

New NAPLAN targets a postive step for individual schools

Opinion: Following the NSW Government's scrapping of existing NAPLAN targets to report on student improvements, Dr Janet Dutton examines the advantages of the new plan where principals have the power to choose the achievement goals that work best for their own schools.

Business and The Economy

Unrecorded and overlooked: the forgotten female history of side gigs in regional Australia

New research has illuminated the vital economic role Australian women in regional areas have played since 1850, running side businesses that help feed families in times of crisis.

Single women in aged care need more funding as new data shows widows living longer

Introducing overnight accommodation for relatives and more family-friendly visiting spaces are among the recommendations arising from new data which captures future trends in aged care in Australia.

Please explain: What is sustainable finance?

To smooth Australia’s pathway to net zero, the Federal Government recently released its Sustainable Finance Strategy. To what extent is it a force for good? Dr Rohan Best, senior lecturer in finance and economics, explains.

Using PayID service may increase identity theft risk

Opinion: PayID, a popular transaction service offered by financial institutions, could potentially increase the risk of identity theft and scams for users, writes Stefan Trueck, Professor of Business Analytics at the Macquarie Business School.

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