Faculty of Science and Engineering

Faculty of Science and Engineering

The future of electronics is chemical
We can’t cram any more processing power into silicon-based computer chips. But a paper published in Nature overnight reveals how we can make electronic devices 10 times smaller, and use molecules to build electronic circuits instead.
The wide and harmful reach of light pollution
Light pollution is doing more than obscuring our view of the universe: it could actually be bad for our health.
Leading telescope science and technology group moves to Macquarie University
Effective 1 July, Macquarie University has assumed responsibility for the research and optical instrumentation capability of the Australian Astronomical Observatory, a group with 45 years of excellence in astronomy instrumentation.
Busy bees reveal what stress can do to the brain
Research into bees' brains has revealed insights into the impact of stress, using a combination of old-school observational science and powerful computer models.
What are pheromones?
Michael Gillings, Distinguished Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences, explains.
Warming oceans will affect sharks’ brains
Rising ocean temperatures due to climate change will not only be felt by smaller organisms like coral, but will also impact apex predators, according to new research.
Coastline crisis: polar ice melting faster than we thought
Sea levels may rise six to eight metres as polar ice-sheets melt – and geological records from the last interglacial period are helping researchers uncover what rising seas mean for global coasts.
Why so blue? New research sheds light on why our iconic blue-tongue lizards have such colourful tongues
A new study by researchers at Macquarie University has shed light on why blue tongue lizards have such an outrageously coloured tongue, given that the vast majority of lizards have a regular pink tongue.
A star-gazers' guide to five celestial events you won't want to miss this year
Astronomy fans, save the dates - here are the top five celestial events you won't want to miss in the second half of this year, says Department of Physics and Astronomy Senior Scientific Officer, Adam Joyce.
Drivers risk death when driving into flood water: new study
New research shows that most Australian drivers think they can work out when it is safe to enter flood waters - as foolhardy Hobart drivers proved during last week's natural disaster.
Sharks can acquire a taste for jazz music
While for many people sharks bring to mind the Jaws theme music, it seems sharks themselves prefer jazz.
Will there be space travel in our lifetime?
To mark Star Wars Day - May fourth - we asked mechanical engineering lecturer, Dr Sammy Diasinos, if commercial flights into the galaxy will be taking off any time soon?