Faculty of Science and Engineering

Faculty of Science and Engineering

Could your smart car be hacked?
Our smart vehicles are increasingly vulnerable and it’s time for stronger safety standards, warns security expert John Baird.
Sydney's biggest green roof welcomes researchers and community gardeners
Through a partnership with Macquarie, a 1920s coal depot has been transformed into a community garden, science lab and outdoor classroom, with more plans afoot.
Turning coffee waste into coffee cups
A Macquarie PhD student believes he’s come up with a way to turn coffee waste into biodegradable plastic coffee cups.
Harnessing the power of a quadrillion suns to fight Motor Neurone Disease, finding far-flung planets, and more: Simon Gross awarded a Tall Poppy Award
Lasers to treat motor neurone disease; and chips that help optical fibres carry more information or identify planets beyond our solar system – Dr Simon Gross from the Department of Physics and Astronomy is making these projects a reality.
How minerals will help shift Australia to renewable energy
Macquarie researchers are building a model of the lithosphere beneath the Australian continent to find the critical minerals and metals we need to shift to renewable energy and to drive technology like smartphones and computers.
Warning colours are getting warmer
As temperatures in Australia and around the world increase, for hibiscus harlequin bugs, the future is orange.
Introducing the five-minute pet
Yes, we love our dogs and cats, but there’s a whole world of wild animals out there that can enrich our daily lives, too, if we let them.
New nanoparticles help detect deep-tissue cancers
Researchers have developed a new form of nanoparticle and associated imaging technique that can detect multiple disease biomarkers, including those for breast cancer, found in deep-tissue in the body.
Surfing bacteria reveal new insights into the ocean’s health
Australian scientists have recorded more than 175,000 tiny microbes dwelling in our ocean waters for the first time, providing an unprecedented baseline against which to measure the effects of climate change and human activities.
$6.9 million quest for new antibiotics from Australia’s unique microbiome
Macquarie University and UWA scientists will join forces with two Australian companies to search for new antibiotics in 500,000 species of Australian microbes.
Top shelf bottom feeders: how dumping fish scraps is putting stingrays at risk
A new study from Macquarie University shows that the habit of dumping fish waste back into the water can have significant and concerning impacts on the behaviour of marine animals.
What is a lunar eclipse?
Astrophysicist Professor Richard de Grijs explains exactly what happens during a lunar eclipse like the rare spectacle that occured on July 28.