Our Stories

Our Stories

Are times tables and cursive writing relics of a pre-digital age?
As school goes back for another year, educators defend the relevance of two traditional skills they say remain key in the age of smart phones and keyboards.
Why do petrol prices fluctuate so much?
Dr Lurion De Mello, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Applied Finance, explains.
Who are Australians in 2019?
Five Macquarie University academics give a snapshot of what it means to be an Australian right now.
Review: Mary Queen of Scots
Here is a gorgeous-looking, highly enjoyable costume drama with one particular scene worth the price of admission alone, writes Stephanie Russo, a Senior Lecturer in the Department of English.
Aged care reforms stumble as older Australians struggle to stay at home
Older Australians would rather be cared for at home, but as the Royal Commission into Aged Care begins in Adelaide this week, a Macquarie researcher has identified significant obstacles in their way.
Positive online hotel reviews have more clout than the complainers
We pay far more attention to positive online hotel reviews - and ignore negative ones, new research has found.
You have a better chance of being a CEO in Australia if you were born in USA, UK or Canada
A study of census data shows the Australian-born are less likely to reach the top of companies than people born overseas.
Drownings up: Foreign visitors can’t spot the risks at beaches and rivers, study finds
Visitors to Australia are at more risk of drowning than locals are – and new research from Macquarie confirms that people born overseas often don’t spot the many hazards around Australia’s waterways.
Why do we swear?
Dr Nick Wilson, lecturer in the Department of Linguistics explains.
Trump addresses the nation: the border 'emergency' explained
Dr Lloyd Cox, who teaches United States politics in the Department of Modern History, Politics and International Relations, clarifies the events leading up to what is set to become the longest government shutdown in US history.
Prepared pet-owners can avoid bushfire grief
Owners of pets and 'love-stock' who have a plan for taking care of their animals in emergencies can avoid the heartbreak of losing them, research shows.
Financial institutions should face serious consequences
Senior leaders of banks, insurance and superannuation firms and mortgage lenders should pay for misconduct with fines and other strong penalties, says Associate Professor Elizabeth Sheedy, from Macquarie University's Applied Finance Centre.